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Disc jockey ‘DJ Stone’ reported missing

The police are reporting that 30-year-old Rayon Thompson, otherwise called ‘DJ Stone’, a disc jockey of Robert Avenue, Kingston 3 has been missing since last month.

He is of brown complexion, slim build and is about 168 centimetres (5 feet 7 inches) tall.

Reports from the Vineyard Town police are that Brown was last seen on Lineral Street in Rollington Town, Kingston 3 in the second week of August. The lawmen were unable to give a specific date.

When last seen, the disc jockey was reportedly wearing brown pants.

Anyone with information as to the whereabouts of Rayon Thompson is being asked to contact the Vineyard Town police at 876-922-3184, police 119 emergency number or the nearest police station.

Contract hit suspected in murder of pastor – cop

Police say they are following several leads into the case where 29-year-old pastor,  James Johnson was shot and killed by a gunman at a church on Old Harbour Road in St Catherine on Thursday evening.

One of the leads suggest that the pastor fell victim to a contract killing, a senior policeman, from the St Catherine North Police station, told Loop News over the weekend.

“We are hearing a number of things on the ground and as we step up our investigation we will be looking at all angles and will not be dismissing any reports and one of the claims we are hearing suggest that his (Johnson’s) killing was a hit,” said the police officer who asked not to be named.

Police said they have also received information that the man who shot and killed the pastor had trailed the clergyman to the location.

“One of the reports we are hearing is that the attacker followed the pastor to the location,” the officer said.

Reports from the Corporate Communication Unit (CCU) are that about 5:00 p.m., Johnson was preparing to teach a class with students at the church when a lone gunman entered the building and opened fire, hitting the pastor.

The man then fled the area.

Johnson was rushed to hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The killing of the pastor has left scores of Jamaicans in shock. Several social media users have not only condemned the attack but said they were still trying to find answers as to why someone would want to harm the clergyman.

The attack comes little over a month after another member from the church community, Arnie Francis, a co-pastor from a church in St Andrew, was attacked in what police said was another suspected contract killing.

Police say the 54-year-old church member who is also a businessman and manager at Alliance Investment Management Limited in New Kingston, St Andrew was attacked and shot as he entered his home in Mona on August 9.

Police said there is no link between both cases.

Jah Cure Hits Back At Accusations From Songwriter

Jah Cure has seemingly responded to his alleged songwriter’s recent claims.

On Thursday, the Grammy-nominated entertainer uploaded a video in studio listening to a new track which will be featured on his upcoming “Royal Soldiers” album due later this year.

Jah Cure made sure to share the lyrics to the single after being accused of cheating a woman who claimed to be the mastermind behind several of his hit singles.

“Haters, and bad mind and wicked heart, (dem a see red) (Chorus)
Unuh see red, see red but I See Green.
Unuh see red, see red but I See Green.
Green like my ganja, green like my cash, no time for drama, juss ah relax.
Unuh see red, see red but I See Green (Verse 1)
This is a world of struggle, 
This is a world of strife.
Don’t let the world kill your light. (Yeah)
Another day, another dollar
No time to fuss and fight
I’m trying to level up my life, my life 

Unuh see red, see red but I See Green.
Unuh see red, see red but I See Green.
Green like my ganja, green like my cash, no time for drama, juss ah relax.
Unuh see red, see red but I See Green.

People betray their brothers,
People kill their friends,
Judas will kiss ya on the cheek, (yeah)
I’m lifting up my brothers,
And I pray for my friends 
Nothing but positivity, you see.

Haters, and bad mind and wicked at heart, (dem see red)
Dun know red means stop and Green means go, dem ah see red)
Haters, and bad mind and wicked at heart, (dem see red)
Dun know red means stop and Green means go, dem ah see red),” The lyrics read.

Earlier this week, Jah Cure was exposed by an alleged songwriter who claims he stole song credits and failed to pay royalties.

During a fiery Instagram Live session, the female singer/songwriter from St Lucia called out The Cure claiming she was cheated out of song credits and royalties for several projects.

According to the woman, she wrote numerous songs for the Reggae superstar and was promised writers credit on his forthcoming “Royal Soldier” album but none of that materialized.

She claims the final straw came earlier this year when the singer cheated her out of credits to a song which appeared on DJ Frass’ “Road To Success” album, claiming that he was the sole writer of the track.

The woman says she worked for the entertainer for more than a year, penning several tracks without receiving any compensation or royalties.

She has since threatened to take legal action against the Reggae superstar for the track, demanding that it be pulled from digital distribution, an action which would cause Dj Frass’ entire album to be pulled from shelves.

The young singer says she was recently contacted by DJ Frass and VP records begging her to take further action but at this point, she “just doesn’t care” anymore.

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The Cure Again!!!!!!! Via @therealjahcure ・・・ Haters, and bad mind and wicked heart, (dem a see red) (Chorus) Unuh see red, see red but I See Green. Unuh see red, see red but I See Green. Green like my ganja, green like my cash, no time for drama, juss ah relax. Unuh see red, see red but I See Green (Verse 1) This is a world of struggle, This is a world of strife. Don’t let the world kill your light. (Yeah) Another day, another dollar No time to fuss and fight I’m trying to level up my life, my life Unuh see red, see red but I See Green. Unuh see red, see red but I See Green. Green like my ganja, green like my cash, no time for drama, juss ah relax. Unuh see red, see red but I See Green. People betray their brothers, People kill their friends, Judas will kiss ya on the cheek, (yeah) I’m lifting up my brothers, And I pray for my friends Nothing but positivity, you see. Haters, and bad mind and wicked at heart, (dem see red) Dun know red means stop and Green means go, dem ah see red) Haters, and bad mind and wicked at heart, (dem see red) Dun know red means stop and Green means go, dem ah see red) #demdead #jahcure

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Blacksan says he is the real ‘Trap King’ – Rygin King stole my style

CPR Squad member Blacksan, or Jamaican 69, as many persons have started to call him because of his multicoloured hairstyle, wants Rygin King to stop referring to himself as the ‘Trap King’.

He claims that he is the rightful ruler of the genre.

“Mi a di Trap King, any other king is a Burger King,” Blacksan told THE WEEKEND STAR.

Fusing trap and dancehall music, which he calls ‘traphall,’ he said Rygin King and other artistes who watch his videos and copy his style.

“Him thief mi style. Yuh know di wul trap thing a my style, is a genre weh me do and mi mix dancehall with trap suh basically is a Migos head pon a Kartel body. A dat new genre deh mi a push. Him just say a trap him a trap. Him just a say di word but the type of music? Him nah dweet,” he said.

And if Rygin King does not stop using the royal title, Blacksan said he has no choice but to challenge the fast rising artiste to a lyrical feud.

“Wi affi tek it musically, cause wi nah tek it physically but musically, him affi put dung dah style deh and yuh know Jamaica style overall, if mi no kill yu, yu nah guh let it go,” he said.

Admitting that 99 per cent of dancehall will ‘diss’ him because of the way he looks, he said he is prepared for the backlash.

“Dem a go try style mi, mi prepare fi di diss and mi a go diss dem back too, cause mi a go nice up dancehall,” he said.

At 24, Blacksan, given name Dane Dawson, also claimed to have never sought formal employment but is still able to show off large stacks of money.

“The same money weh fi inna my career, it same one a spend. Suh instead mi bank it, mi just flex wid it and know say tomorrow, mi affi recuperate back more money cause mi affi walk wid at least $200,000 or $300,000 pon mi every day because a di type of life of trap.”

And although his ‘rainbow’ hairstyle is similar to US rapper Tekashi 6ix9ine, he claims that he has been doing it for years.

“A mi attitude, a mi personality, from mi a likkle yute mi eva a colour mi hair 10 different colour, all different extension. Mi a put in extension before Kartel put it on, but when mi a put it in dem call it braid and when the general come put it in, dem say a extension. A style and when mi drop it back, dem seh watch how him a follow Kartel, no! A mi set it,” he said.

Efforts to get a comment from Rygin King or members of his team proved futile.

Business or politics? – Entertainers performing on the campaign trail

Whenever on the campaign trail, or other political events such as rallies, both political parties tend to employ the services of popular entertainers.

In recent weeks, artistes such as Teejay, Rygin King and Wayne Marshall have graced political platforms, bringing with them a dancehall-like atmosphere.

However, according to representatives from both major political parties, a number of factors are considered before these artistes are engaged.

Julian Robinson, general secretary of the People’s National Party, told The Gleaner that his party tend to select entertainers who have values in keeping with those of the party.

“Based on the music, the consciousness, the songs that an entertainer sings, whether it is consistent with our own values, and whether them coming would provide some kind of vibe to the meeting that we have,” he said.

He added, “We have entertainers who have performed at events for both parties so it does not necessarily means that they are necessarily a supporter of the party.”

REMAINING NEUTRAL

Robinson said that most entertainers do not publicly declare a preference because they want to remain neutral and they want to appeal to a wide cross-section of persons.

“Sometimes people volunteer, sometimes they ask for a fee – depending on what they do and how long they are gonna be on,” he said.

Delano Seiveright, a member of the ruling Jamaica Labour Party, said that one superseding factor is what song has the ‘hype’ at the time.

“We try to encourage artistes who are at that level, where they have hits – who people love, especially on the trail. We get them to come to our events,” he told The Gleaner.

Another reason, he says an entertainer may choose to perform at a political event is based on the relationship that they may have with some members of the party.

“Artistes have their different persuasion. For some, it is not political. Some may be because they have a good relationship with members of the party, and they would do it as a friendly gesture,” he said.

Seiveright added that having entertainers at party events is more of a treat for the audience rather than a ploy to ‘drum up’ more support for the party.

“It tends to be a surprise to rile up the crowd. It is not that the entertainer draws the crowd, it is always a treat for the audience to have a popular entertainer,” he said.

“It gives a vibe to the meetings and it is good to diversify your meeting with different offerings, so it is not all politics – there is something else that some people will love and appreciate.”

Selector Tony Mattheron feels the political climate in Jamaica has improved to the point where artistes perform at political parties or even boldly throw their support behind a party, without much backlash.

“I think it is good nowadays because politics is not what it used to be. Back in the ’70s, if yuh ago do dat, yuh know which side a di fence yuh fall,” he said.

“Nowadays, artistes perform at political rallies and it don’t have no big impact on the artiste,” he said.

Business or politics? – Entertainers performing on the campaign trail

Whenever on the campaign trail, or other political events such as rallies, both political parties tend to employ the services of popular entertainers.

In recent weeks, artistes such as Teejay, Rygin King and Wayne Marshall have graced political platforms, bringing with them a dancehall-like atmosphere.

However, according to representatives from both major political parties, a number of factors are considered before these artistes are engaged.

Julian Robinson, general secretary of the People’s National Party, told The Gleaner that his party tend to select entertainers who have values in keeping with those of the party.

“Based on the music, the consciousness, the songs that an entertainer sings, whether it is consistent with our own values, and whether them coming would provide some kind of vibe to the meeting that we have,” he said.

He added, “We have entertainers who have performed at events for both parties so it does not necessarily means that they are necessarily a supporter of the party.”

REMAINING NEUTRAL

Robinson said that most entertainers do not publicly declare a preference because they want to remain neutral and they want to appeal to a wide cross-section of persons.

“Sometimes people volunteer, sometimes they ask for a fee – depending on what they do and how long they are gonna be on,” he said.

Delano Seiveright, a member of the ruling Jamaica Labour Party, said that one superseding factor is what song has the ‘hype’ at the time.

“We try to encourage artistes who are at that level, where they have hits – who people love, especially on the trail. We get them to come to our events,” he told The Gleaner.

Another reason, he says an entertainer may choose to perform at a political event is based on the relationship that they may have with some members of the party.

“Artistes have their different persuasion. For some, it is not political. Some may be because they have a good relationship with members of the party, and they would do it as a friendly gesture,” he said.

Seiveright added that having entertainers at party events is more of a treat for the audience rather than a ploy to ‘drum up’ more support for the party.

“It tends to be a surprise to rile up the crowd. It is not that the entertainer draws the crowd, it is always a treat for the audience to have a popular entertainer,” he said.

“It gives a vibe to the meetings and it is good to diversify your meeting with different offerings, so it is not all politics – there is something else that some people will love and appreciate.”

Selector Tony Mattheron feels the political climate in Jamaica has improved to the point where artistes perform at political parties or even boldly throw their support behind a party, without much backlash.

“I think it is good nowadays because politics is not what it used to be. Back in the ’70s, if yuh ago do dat, yuh know which side a di fence yuh fall,” he said.

“Nowadays, artistes perform at political rallies and it don’t have no big impact on the artiste,” he said.

Pastor shot dead while at church in St Catherine

A 29-year-old pastor was shot and killed by a gunman at a church on Old Harbour Road in St Catherine.

The deceased has been identified as James Johnson, a member the Church of God of Prophecy, located on Old Harbour Road in St Catherine.

Reports from the Corporate Communication Unit (CCU) are that at about 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Johnson was teaching a class with students at the church when a lone gunman entered the building and opened fire, hitting the pastor.

The man then fled the area.

Johnson was rushed to hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

A number of persons, especially those from the church community, have taken to social media to expressed shock and anger at the killing.

“This is really a sad development. Just goes to show where the crime situation is at this point in time,” said one social media user.

“Grace Worship Centre COGOP Family extends deepest condolence to the family of Minister/Pastor James Johnson and the entire Church of God of Prophecy Family in Jamaica,” another social media post stated.

“Only child for his mother. We pray for the swift hands of God against his killer or killers,” said another post.

The Spanish Town police are investigating the incident.

Omar Collymore charged with attempted murder of another woman

Omar Collymore, who is before the courts for the alleged contract killing of his wife, Simone and a driver who was transporting her in January of this year, has been slapped with another murder-related charge.

Collymore has been charged with attempted murder in relation to another woman, following a recent ruling by the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP).

Reports are that in late December last year, a former girlfriend of Collymore was ambushed by gunmen while she was driving in St Andrew, and fired on.

The intended victim, however, managed to escape the attack unharmed.

That incident was reportedly followed up some days later by the attack on Simone Collymore and the driver, Winston Walters, who was in her company on arrival at her home. The same group of gunmen from the first attack reportedly took part in the attack on Simone Collymore and Walters.

The two were shot dead on January 2 just inside the Forrest Hills, St Andrew apartment complex.

Following intense police investigations, Omar Collymore was charged with his wife’s murder, this after being nabbed at a guesthouse in St Elizabeth, reportedly on a failed bid to illegally leave the island.

Reports are that a confession from one of the gunmen who were arrested alongside Collymore, resulted in Collymore being linked to the attack on his previous acquaintance.

Five accused, including Collymore, appeared in the Gun Court section of the St Andrew Parish Court on Thursday, and were all remanded until October 12, when an application for bail is expected to be heard.

Drunken man killed and robbed of AK-47 rifle in Flanker, St James

The St James police are yet to make a breakthrough with their probe into Monday night’s killing of a rifle-slinging, drunken man who was shot and dispossessed of the high-powered weapon in the inner-city community of Flanker in Montego Bay.

The deceased has been identified as 51-year-old Courtney Clarke, also called ‘Jesus’, of a St James address.

The police said about 10:30 p.m., an intoxicated Clarke bragged among a group of persons in the Flanker community that his gun was bigger than those of a group of men from the same community with whom he had a dispute.

Clarke then left the scene and was reportedly returning with an AK-47 rifle, supposedly to prove his point, when he was intercepted and sprayed with bullets.

He died on the spot and the rifle was stolen.

Clarke has been described as a “longtime bad man from in the 1990s”, who was said to have subsequently become hooked on alcohol.

Business titan William McConnell dies

Business titan and Jamaica Observer board member William Anthony “Billy” McConnell lost a long battle with cancer yesterday, plunging the business community into mourning for a man whom Prime Minister Andrew Holness hailed as a “trailblazer, nation-builder and inspiration to a generation of industry professionals and innovators”.

McConnell, who was 71, is survived by his wife, Patricia Dawn, whom he married in 1972, son David and daughter Susan.

He was honoured with both the Order of Distinction (Commander) in 1996, and the Order of Jamaica for distinguished leadership in business and the export industry in 2006.

A chartered accountant, McConnell was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Laws (LLD) by The University of the West Indies (UWI).

McConnell served as managing director of Lascelles De Mercado & Co Ltd and the Wray & Nephew Group of Companies.

Yesterday, the prime minister expressed sincere condolence to McConnell’s family, friends and associates, and said that “Jamaica has lost one of its important sons who championed its development and modernisation”.

Holness added that McConnell was not only a businessman but an advocate for sustainable and progressive policies that would boost employment and spur economic growth. He credited McConnell for his “tremendous work” with the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica (PSOJ) as well as his various stints on State boards.

He also noted that McConnell’s efforts at encouraging a liberalised free market, as well as his championing of the removal of foreign exchange controls “created the environment where private business could prosper and enhanced the ability of entrepreneurs to develop competitive enterprises”.

“The Government and people of Jamaica owe a debt of gratitude to Mr McConnell for his vision and dedication to the development of Jamaica and its people,” the prime minister said.

Opposition Leader Dr Peter Phillips expressed sadness at McConnell’s passing and said his “remarkable contribution to the development of the nation’s business sector is well recognised”. He also said that McConnell had given outstanding service to the country through the private sector, in particular through Lascelles De Mercado Ltd and J Wray & Nephew.

“At the leadership level of the Private Sector Organisation of Jamaica Mr McConnell was instrumental in several major initiatives which promoted the interests of not only the membership, but assisted many other sectors towards national advancement,” Phillips said.

“Jamaica has lost a stalwart of industries and a good and faithful son,” the Opposition leader added and expressed condolence to McConnell’s family, friends and colleagues.

Observer and ATL Group Chairman Gordon “Butch” Stewart, who shared a long friendship with McConnell, was crushed by the business leader’s passing.

“He was one of Jamaica’s stalwart business managers, and his tenure at Wray & Nephew was remarkable,” Stewart said.

He noted that McConnell, through his participation in different organisations, particularly the PSOJ, was always supportive of the private sector.

“Billy served on the Jamaica Observer board for a number of years with tremendous results. He was a friend to one and all, a strong family man. We’re going to miss him terribly,” Stewart said.

McConnell served the boards of a number of other companies, as well as the PSOJ as either vice-president or honorary secretary continuously for more than two decades.

Current PSOJ President Howard Mitchell said last night that he was devastated by the news of McConnell’s death.

“He was the root and the tree of the PSOJ, and was our honorary secretary for many years. The advice and service he gave were invaluable to us,” Mitchell told the Observer.

He said that the PSOJ would issue a release today in recognition of McConnell’s service to the organisation and the country.

McConnell joined J Wray & Nephew Limited as a financial accountant in 1973 and was eventually named managing director of the Wray & Nephew Group of Companies in 1977.

He served as the chairman of Globe Insurance Company of the West Indies, Scotia Investment Jamaica Limited and the Sugar Manufacturing Corporation of Jamaica Limited.

He also served as chairman of both the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica and Petrojam Limited, as well as chairman of Scotia Jamaica Investment Management Limited and Scotia Group Jamaica Limited until November 2007.

Regarded as an excellent business leader, McConnell also served on the boards of Wray & Nephew Limited, Bank of Nova Scotia Jamaica Limited, University Hospital of the West Indies — Private Wing Limited, and Lascelles De Mercado & Co Ltd.

He also served as a non-executive director of Dolphin Cove Limited from September 2010 to February 27, 2018; and director of Carreras Limited from 1997 to September 2015.

Up to recently, he was a director of Spirits Pool Association of Jamaica, as well as the Sugar Industry Authority.

He also served Edwin Charley (Jamaica) Ltd, Rum Company (Jamaica) Ltd, Newton Cane Farms Ltd, Jamaica Estate Tours Ltd, New Yarmouth Ltd, New Yarmouth Holdings Ltd, Henriques Brothers Ltd, Daniel Finzi & Co Ltd, Caribbean Molasses Ltd, Jamaica Rum & Spirits Trade Association, Federated Pharmaceuticals Ltd, and Lascelles Laboratories Ltd.

William McConnell was born in Montego Bay on February 20, 1947, to David Charles McConnell and Elizabeth Charley-McConnell. He was educated at deCarteret School and Munro College in Jamaica, and the Dean Close School in the United Kingdom.

He attended McGill University (Canada) and began his working career at PriceWaterhouse (Montreal, Canada), then went to Touche Ross Thorburn (Kingston). An Anglican by religion, McConnell’s hobbies included tennis, golf and shooting. He was a member the Constant Spring Golf Club, Liguanea Club, Caymanas Golf Club, Trelawny Gun Club, and Kingston Cricket Club.

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